Grapefruit Juice & Some Drugs Don't Mix

Grapefruit juice and the actual grapefruit can be part of a healthy diet. Grapefruit has vitamin C and potassium—nutrients your body needs to work properly.  But it isn’t good for you when it affects the way your medicines work, especially if you have high blood pressure or arrhythmia (irregular or abnormal heart beat).  The FDA has required that some prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs taken by mouth include warnings against drinking grapefruit juice or eating grapefruit while taking the drug.

 

Talk to your doctor, pharmacist or other health care provider and read any information provided with your prescription or OTC drug to find out:

 

  • If your specific drug may be affected.
  • How much, if any, grapefruit juice you can have.
  • What other fruits or juices may also affect your drug in a similar way to grapefruit juice.
  • How Grapefruit Juice Can Interfere With Medications

 

Find Out if You Should Avoid Grapefruit or Other Juices.  Ask your doctor, pharmacist or other health care provider if you can drink grapefruit juice while taking your medication.  Read the medication guide or patient information sheet that comes with your prescription drug to find out if grapefruit juice affects your drug.  Read the Drug Facts label on your OTC drug, which will say whether you shouldn’t have grapefruit or other fruit juices with it. If you must avoid grapefruit juice with your medicine, check the labels of fruit juices or drinks flavored with fruit juice to see whether they are made with grapefruit juice.  Seville oranges (often used to make orange marmalade), pomelos, and tangelos (a cross between tangerines and grapefruit) may have the same effect as grapefruit juice. Do not

https://www.fda.gov/forconsumers/consumerupdates/ucm292276.htm?source=govdeliver...