News you can use: health & drug safety updates

2018

  • March 13, 2018

    Few older Americans believe ordering more tests and drugs is the way to better health care, a new survey finds. Of the more than 2,000 respondents aged 50 to 80, just 14 percent thought that "more is better," according to the National Poll on Healthy Aging. In fact, 54 percent said they believe that health care providers often recommend tests, medications or procedures that patients don't really need:

    • One in four poll participants said their health care providers often order tests or prescribe drugs that aren't necessary.
    • One in six said this had happened to them in the past year.
    • About half said they'd had the test or filled the prescription.

    However, about 10 percent said their doctor or other health care provider had told them that a test or medication they'd asked for wasn't needed. Most said the provider explained why, but 40 percent didn't completely understand the explanation. The poll was conducted by the University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. It was sponsored by AARP and Michigan Medicine. "These findings suggest patients and providers need to work together more to prevent overuse of health care services that provide the least value to patients," noted Dr. Jeffrey Kullgren, who designed and analyzed the poll results.  As importantly, more attention needs to be focused on improving communication between patients and doctors.

  • March 9, 2018

    A recent 12-month study compared the use opioid medication and non-opioid medication for the treatment of 240 Veterans Affairs primary care clinic patients with moderate to severe chronic back pain or hip or knee osteoarthritis pain despite analgesic use.  Findings: The two groups did not differ significantly on pain-related function -the primary outcome. Pain intensity was significantly better in the non-opioid group.  Additionally, adverse medication-related symptoms were more common in the opioid group. Researchers’ Conclusion: "Treatment with opioids was not superior to treatment with non-opioid medications for improving pain-related function over 12 months. Results do not support initiation of opioid therapy for moderate to severe chronic back pain or hip or knee osteoarthritis pain."

  • March 1, 2018

    NCPIE serves as co-editor for a monthly column in Pharmacy Today (American Pharmacists Association) The column is entitled “One-to-One” and is intended to help develop pharmacists’ medication communication and counseling skills to promote safe and appropriate medicine use.

  • February 20, 2018

    This interactive web-based, four-part program is designed to help clinicians optimize antibiotic use to combat antibiotic resistance and improve healthcare quality and patient safety. This course will include information about antibiotic resistance and threats and a detailed explanation of the benefits of antibiotic stewardship. Objectives include:  Optimize antibiotic prescribing and use to protect patients and combat the threat of antibiotic resistance; inform healthcare professionals about proper antibiotic use;  encourage open discussion among physicians and patients. Open to all clinicians, pharmacists, physician assistants, nurses, certified health educators, and public health practitioners with an MPH.  Earn 8 hours of free CE.

  • February 9, 2018

    The American Medical Association (AMA) is launching a new digital tool kit as part of its ongoing efforts to improve access to high-quality treatment for patients seeking multidisciplinary pain care and for a substance use disorder. The tool kit will be used by the AMA and the nation’s medical societies to urge physicians to upload stories about their patients who encounter obstacles when seeking care for pain and/or a substance use disorder.

    The “Share Your Story” campaign is part of the AMA’s work to end the opioid epidemic and is designed to highlight physician efforts as well as urge payers and policymakers to improve access to treatment.

  • February 6, 2018

    NCPIE has joined leading public health organizations to launch Allied Against Opioid Abuse (AAOA), a national education and awareness initiative to help combat the nation’s opioid abuse epidemic. AAOA brings the National Council on Patient Information and Education together with other key healthcare community stakeholders, including the Caregiver Action Network, Healthcare Distribution Alliance, Mental Health America (MHA), National Alliance of State Pharmacy Associations (NASPA), and the PA Foundation, to educate about the rights, risks and responsibilities associated with prescription opioids.  Follow  AAOA on Twitter (@AAOA_Tweets). Look for updates as the coalition moves forward.

  • February 1, 2018

    NCPIE serves as co-editor for a monthly column in Pharmacy Today (American Pharmacists Association) The column is entitled “One-to-One” and is intended to help develop pharmacists’ medication communication and counseling skills to promote safe and appropriate medicine use.

  • January 31, 2018

    FDA announced Tuesday a new action to combat the increasing problem of misuse and abuse of the OTC antidiarrheal drug loperamide. When used at very high and dangerous doses, the drug may be used by some individuals as a way to manage opioid withdrawal symptoms or to achieve the euphoric effects of opioid use. FDA is requesting that manufacturers of OTC loperamide "change the way they label and package these drugs to stem abuse and misuse that leaves us deeply concerned," FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, said.

  • January 19, 2018

    New research shows that the number of privately insured U.S. women aged 15–44 years who filled a prescription for an ADHD drug rose 344% between 2003 and 2015, from 0.9% to 4%. According to the study, the number of women aged 25–29 years who filled an ADHD prescription increased by 700%, while there was a 560% increase among women aged 30–34 years.

  • January 12, 2018

    FDA announced safety labeling changes to limit the use of prescription opioid cough and cold medicines containing codeine or hydrocodone in children younger than age 18 years, saying the risks of the medicines outweigh their potential benefits.  Per FDA, After safety labeling changes are made, these products will no longer be indicated for use to treat cough in any pediatric population and will be labeled for use only in adults aged 18 years and older.

Pages